Leucistic
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Blue Eyed Leucistic

The first Blue Eyed Leucistic was produced in 2002. Since that time there have been a number of mutation combinations that have produced Blue Eyed Leucistics.

We produced our first Blue Eyed Leucistic in conjunction with Vin Russo of Cutting Edge Herp.com, in July of 2005.

At the 2004 National Reptile Breeders’ Expo in Daytona, we entered into a breeding loan with Vin. He offered to supply us with a yearling Leucistic Het male to breed to one of our 18 month old Mojave females. Seeing that earlier in the 2004 breeding season, a Lesser Platinum bred to a Mojave produced a Blue Eyed Leucistic, we were sure the outcome would be the same. Our decision was made before the Super Mojave (also a Blue Eyed Leucistic) was produced. Well, it turned out to be a very good gamble. Our 18 month old Mojave laid 7 good eggs and all 7 hatched. The outcome of the clutch was a pair of Leucistics, a pair of Mojaves, a female Het Leucistic and two normal males.

Blue Eyed Leucistic ball pythons have been produced by breeding the following combinations:

Het Leucistic (Russo Line) X Het Leucistic (Russo Line)

Lesser Platinum X Phantom

Lesser Platinum X Lesser Platinum

Platinum X Lesser Platinum

Lesser Platinum X Mojave

Mojave X Mojave

Het Leucistic (Russo Line) X Mojave

What are the genetic differences between the different Blue Eyed Leucistics? Our theory is when bred to Wild Type (normal) ball pythons the Leucistics produced from multiple mutations (example Het Leucistic (Russo Line) X Mojave, Lesser Platinum X Mojave and Lesser Platinum X Phantom) should produce 25% Leucistics. The Leucistics from same mutation breedings bred to Wild Type (normal) ball pythons should produce 100% Heterozygous offspring because they are the homozygous form of that mutation. At this time, this is only our theory and we hope to prove it out in the 2006 breeding season.

 

 
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